Easing Your Anxiety After The Death Of A Loved One

Dealing with the anxiety and depression of losing a loved one is difficult and can be hard to manage, but being able to move on from tragedy will make you stronger and help you grow.

Releasing the sadness related to losing a loved one does not mean you’re forgetting or dishonoring that person; in fact, you are doing the complete opposite. Minding your behavior and your thoughts after the death of a loved one will help you control your anxiety and embrace the future.

Focus on the Love

Remembering what you really loved about someone will help ease your mind about that person's passing. You can't do anything about what has occurred, but focusing on the goodwill help release some of the negative feelings and reduce the anxiety you feel when remembering this tragedy. You were blessed to have known this special person; focus on that.

Surround Yourself with Others

After the initial shock of the tragedy, surrounding yourself with friends and family is the best way to keep your mind off of losing someone close to you. Express how you’re feeling to those around you, and watch how many step up to the plate to be there for and assist you during this difficult time. Keeping yourself occupied will help relieve the anxiety related to the tragedy.

Avoid Triggers

There may be certain “triggers” that remind you of the loved one who passed; restaurants, movies, etc. Try avoiding these, at least at first. If the sight of a picture of him or her throw you into a panic attack, give it to someone else for safekeeping until you’re ready. Being constantly reminded of someone who has passed can sometimes make the physical symptoms of your anxiety worse.


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