Five Tips On How To Overcome Your Fear Of Public Speaking

The number one biggest fear of human beings is Glossophobia, also known as having a fear of public speaking. Some even fear public speaking more than death. Letting the stress of speech-making control your life will hinder your ability to positively and effectively communicate with others.

Despite age or profession, each one of us will be subjected to public speaking sometime over the course of our lives; developing the skill can boost confidence and improve relationships both professionally and personally. Use the following quick tips to relieve your anxiety next time you’re asked to speak.

1. Practice
The expression “Practice makes perfect” really is true. If you feel some social anxiety practicing in front of others, try speaking into a mirror. Watching yourself and becoming comfortable alone will help you feel poised and secure next time you’re in front of an audience. Recite a speech as many times as possible before you have to give it.

2. Prepare
Know your audience. Who are you delivering this speech to? Tailor it to keep them engaged and interested. If possible, create an outline using note cards or a PowerPoint; being able to see what you planned on discussing will allow you to relax and deliver, rather than worry about what’s coming next.

3. Take Criticism
Once you feel ready, give your speech to a trusted friend or colleague. Before you have a panic attack, prepare yourself. The worst they’ll say is “try again,” with some constructive advice on what to change. It’s a win-win situation.

4. Build Gradually
If it’s possible, begin giving speeches to smaller audiences, or those you feel more comfortable in front of. Once you’ve mastered those, then move on to bigger and more intimidating crowds. Soon you’ll find your anxiety melting away and a new skill in its place.

5. Remember
You are your biggest critic. Even if you’re nervous, get up there and speak anyway. Chances are, the audience isn’t noticing that nervous rattle in your voice that seems so prominent to you. Take a deep breath, check yourself in the mirror one last time, and rest assured you’ll get through it.

Photo: Pexels

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