Physical Symptoms of Anxiety: Skin Conditions

Feelings of anxiety and stress cause a number of physical and chemical changes in the body, including the release of adrenaline and other hormones. As a result, people suffering from anxiety typically experience a variety of physical symptoms, which often include a rapid heartbeat, sweating, flushing, trembling, and shortness of breath. In addition, anxiety and stress can trigger or exacerbate skin conditions such as rashes, psoriasis, rosacea, and eczema.

Hives and Rashes

There are many possible causes of a rash, including allergic reaction and infection. However, some people find that they experience itchy skin or hives when they are particularly stressed or anxious. If anxiety causes severe or prolonged sweating, it is also possible to develop a heat rash.

Rosacea

The inflammatory skin condition rosacea is often made worse by stress, due to an increase in blood flow to the surface of the skin. This increase in blood flow, common to episodes of increased stress or anxiety, can also cause a flushing of the skin even in people who do not have rosacea.

Psoriasis and Eczema

Stress is known to impact a person's immune system, which is thought to be one reason why it can trigger episodes of psoriasis and eczema. It should be noted that even though stress and anxiety are known to worsen these conditions, they do not cause either of them.

Photo: Pixabay

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