How to Control Anxiety Without Medication

Controlling anxiety is never an easy thing to do. Some suffering from an anxiety disorder chooses to take medication to ease their symptoms.

However, it is possible to reduce your anxiety without using strong prescription drugs. Various techniques can help you reach the root anxiety causes and get rid of them.

Keep a Journal

Keep a record of how you feel every day. Journal how you’re feeling, what you did that day, what you ate - be thorough. After a couple of weeks, take a look back into when and where you felt the most anxious. What were you doing that day? Notice any patterns that may emerge from this journaling exercise, and take the necessary steps to minimize your anxiety triggers.

Make a To-Do List

A to-do list is an obviously easy task, but one that few consider being a path to easing the mind. Writing down what you have to do each day (or week) is an important way to keep organized and maintain a sense of balance and control.

If scheduling your week in a planner works best for you, do that. If you like keeping post-it notes with the day’s activities posted around your home, do that. Making a to-do list leaves space in your brain to think about the task at hand, rather than the 10 other tasks you have to get done later.


Relax and Rejuvenate

Stop being a “yes” person. If taking one of your weekend days to lounge around and watch TV is what relaxes you, make sure to pencil that in. Getting enough “me time” is crucial to our health and well-being; make sure you’re not stretching yourself too thin. Find what puts you in a peaceful state of mind, and allow yourself to indulge.

Photo: Pixabay

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